Operation Scan All The Things Complete

I am done. I have scanned some 6240 photos over the last 6 months, a mixture of 35mm, 110, 4x3” and slide film, not to mention a large quantity of printed pictures. Just over a 1000 images came from my grandparents photo collection, and the other 5000+ my parents. If I’m honest, it has been a slog; a slog I don’t wish to repeat. Constantly switching negatives over, adjusting images, trying to guesstimate when a photo might have been taken, trying to work out who is in what photo and if I’m feeling really pedantic, where the photo might have been taken. »

Operation Scan All The Things

So this weekend I started a new personal project, its not programming related, but it does involve a computer. A computer and what can only be defined as a “shit ton” of negatives. After playing with Google Photos, deciding that its the greatest thing since sliced bread and introducing it to my entire family; I’ve decided to archive my parents entire collection of film. Why Google photos Google Photos is an online service that provides unlimited photo and video storage (provided image are no more than 16MP and no videos no greater than 1080). »

Operation Scan All The Things 1st 1000

So operation “scan all the things” is well and truely under way. I’ve scanned/adjusted just over 1000 photos and wanted to provide some insight into the results and process modification over the last few weeks. Negative Tray Utilisation So initially I was scanning the 35mm negatives as I found them. The scanner can hold 12 at a time, but they’re typically sliced in strips of 4. I quickly realised loading the scanner with 8 negatives when it can take 12 is a waste of my time. »